Safe, Edible Slime

Having a 2 year old who likes to taste an array of weird and gross things, I really appreciate sensory play recipes that are safe to ingest.  Though I don’t recommend letting your little one chow down on this slime (plus it doesn’t exactly taste wonderful) if they were to try a sample, it won’t hurt them.

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This slime is just so fun to play with.  It’s gooey, slimy, shiny, squishy, stretchy, wiggly, bouncy and it doesn’t stick to your hands so the mess is limited (bonus!)  And, you only need 2 ingredients!

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What you’ll need:

1 tbsp Metamucil

1 cup Water

Food colouring (optional)

Mix the above ingredients in a large microwavable bowl (larger than you think you’ll need).  Put it in the microwave on high for 5 mins.  It should boil over the top of the bowl.  Remove and let cool slightly.  It should be gel like.  If needed microwave for another 3-5 mins.  Dump onto a surface to cool – careful, it’s really hot!  Once cool to touch, it’s time to play!

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This kept my daycare kids entertained for an hour!  A whole hour, it was amazing.  We put it in a ziplock bag after for them to take home.

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What Materials Should I Get for my Preschooler?

This is the difficult question for all parents starting out in Montessori.  There are so many materials and they can be quite expensive.  Do I need them all?  Can I substitute something else?  What can I make myself?  Why do I need that material?  It can be so hard to decide.  First off I recommend reading David Gettman’s “Basic Montessori”.  When you have an understanding of what the purpose of each material is, you’ll be better able to decide what you need now and what can wait and what you can skip.

There are lots of DIY ideas online for Montessori materials.  For me, however, I just don’t have the time to make things.  I don’t have time to go shopping to find the materials to make them, and then I don’t have time to put them together, and maybe it’s just because I’m in Canada, but often it costs the same, if not more, to make it myself.  And then what usually happens is I’m not happy with the result and I wind up purchasing what I tried to make and I’m out the money I spent trying to do it myself.  So I tend to purchase.  If you have the time and skill to make things yourself, go ahead, just don’t under-estimate the amount of time it’ll take and the expense.

So, what should you buy for your little preschooler?  Well here’s Pumpkins and Me’s must have Montessori list: (Links to my favourite Canadian site to purchase from IFIT in the headings)

Knobbed Cylinder Blocks: If you have a 2-3 year old, these are a big hit.  Heck, even I love doing them.  They not only stimulate spacial recognition, the knobs help children learn proper pencil grip.  I don’t recommend the Mini Cylinder blocks because they’re too easy. Your child will figure them out quickly.  If you can’t afford the whole set, Montessori Outlet sells them individually.  Blocks 1 & 3 change by height and width, blocks 2 & 4 change by just one aspect, either height or width.  Blocks 2 & 4 are more challenging than 1 & 3.  If you can, especially if you have a little one, get the whole set.

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Pink Tower:  This is another must have in my book.  Now you might be wondering why you can’t just use plastic nesting and stacking blocks or the like.  With the Pink Tower a child can feel the difference in weight between the blocks.  Also they’re all one colour so there is nothing to distract from the sensory learning experience of size.  Also the sensory materials tend to be in groups of 10 to start awareness of number grouping.

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Knobless Cylinders There are so many things that can be done with the Knobless Cylinders.  Each box contains 10 cylinders of varying heights and widths.  They can be combined into so many patterns and there are many extensions that can be printed off to use with them.  However they aren’t introduced until Period 5 in Gettman, but I use them with my 2 year old, they’re a little advanced for her but a 3 year old would have no problem with them.

Geometric Solids:  These are a wonderful sensory experience for children.  My 2 year old likes to match them with the bases.  She’s learned the names of most of them already too.  There are other sets out there that are cheaper.  Here’s some from Scholar’s Choice.  However, like the Pink Tower, I think it’s best if they’re all one colour.  Also, keep in mind that the Nomenclature cards usually depict the blue Montessori shapes.

Geometric Cabinet: This is an expensive purchase but I feel it’s an important one.  You could try making your own out of foam board but I think it’d be a tricky task.  This material has so many uses.  A puzzle, learning shapes, the knobs are good preparation for pencil holding and as the child learns to trace around the shapes and the frames with their finger they’re preparing for tracing the metal insets.  Also, if you can’t afford the metal insets, you can have your child trace the insets in the Geometric Cabinet if you’re ok with them getting marked up a bit.  The Geometric Demonstration Tray is sold separately, so you might want to get it as well, though it isn’t really necessary.  For $5 you might want to consider getting the Control Chart as some of those names of triangles are tricky.

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Binomial Cube: This isn’t something that you can easily make yourself and you’re not really going to find anywhere else.  It’s important for developing the child’s visual perception of three dimensional patterns.

Red Rods: These wouldn’t be too hard to make yourself.  I was going to get my husband to make them but I was sent them by mistake and decided to pay to keep them.  They are quite big but I think that makes the sensory experience that much more interesting.  I was tempted to purchase just the Number Rods but the lines would distract from the sense of length.  Numbers aren’t introduced until Period 3 in Gettman so I’d recommend getting the Red Rods.  There is also small Number Rods available, so you could save money by getting them instead of the large ones.  If you’re lacking in space I’d recommend getting the Rod Stand as well.

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Sandpaper Numbers: These aren’t introduced until Period 4 in Gettman so they’re something you can wait on.  They wouldn’t be too difficult to make yourself.  I don’t recommend the Sandpaper materials from Montessori Outlet.  They put some type of glue on the wood and cover it with coarse sand.  It’s sheds like crazy, making a mess, and feels terrible, it’s just too coarse.  The sandpaper materials for IFIT and Affordable Montessori are much nicer.

Sandpaper Letters: These are an important material for learning.  Combining touch with learning cements it in the brain.  You want to teach the lower case letters first so don’t purchase the Upper Case letters until later.  Also, you’ll need to decide if you want to teach cursive or print.  Cursive is usually taught in traditional Montessori but nowadays many schools and parents teach print.  I have heard it’s a read chore to make these yourself but you could try.  Affordable Montessori has a mini set in print of both lower and upper case.  Here’s a different option from IFIT that has number and letters but it looks like they are groved into wood rather than sandpaper letters, but they would serve the same purpose.  There is also a set on Amazon.ca

Sandpaper & Colour Globes:  These is also difficult to make yourself, but there are several DIY tutorials on the net.  This is introduced in Period 1 in Gettman.  The one on IFIT is said to be not good quality.  I have the Sandpaper globe from Affordable Montessori and it looks very similar and the quality seems fine to me.  The children really like to feel the globe.  In Montessori the continents each have a colour that is used on the puzzles and the globe so that is why you might want to consider having the Montessori globe rather than a regular one.  If money is tight, just get the Sandpaper Globe.

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Moveable Alphabet:  This isn’t introduced until Period 4, after the I Spy game and the Sandpaper letters are completed.  Why the Moveable alphabet rather than just magnetic letters?  Because the Movable Alphabet comes with multiples of each letter so the child can write words.  Writing comes before reading in Montessori.  Also there is the option of cursive letters.  This is something that you can wait to get.  Montessori Outlet offers the letters separate from the box so you can save money, but I recommend getting a box as it allows you to store the letters sorted so your child isn’t frustrated trying to find the letter he wants.  However, you might be able to find other storage options.  I haven’t reached this stage yet but I think you’d only need the lower case.  By the time your child is using upper case they will most likely be writing on their own.  Another option is to print out multiples of each letter and laminate them or purchase this.

What about all the other materials?

Brown Stair:  This is expensive and not necessary, though there are a lot of extensions you can do combining the Brown Stair and Pink Tower.  If you can afford it, it’s nice to have.  If you can’t, then you’ll be fine without it.

Spindle Box: This is one thing I made my own version of.  Read about it here.  There are also lots of other DIY ideas on line.  Another option that I actually like better and is great for younger ones is this from Scholar’s Choice.

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Colour Boxes: There are tons of colour activities you can do with objects around the house or make from paint chips that this is defiantly one area you can skip purchasing.  If you did want to purchase, IFIT has a Box 4 that can be used for grading shades and matching colours.

Metal Insets: Definitely not necessary but they’re really nice.  You could instead have your child trace the shapes in the Geometric Cabinet or get some stencils to trace.  If you can afford it, I’d get them.  Montessori Outlet sells them without the stands so you can get them for a little less.

Touch Tablets, Thermic Tablets, Baric Tablets, Sound boxes:  First off, my feeling is that these are great in a classroom, but not necessary at home.  There are so many daily experiences you can give your child without these.  Feeling ice cubes, feeling how heavy things are, talking about soft, smooth, rough toys, different sounds, etc… Also it’s not too hard to make your own touch Tablets and Sound boxes.

Bells: Music as been shown to expand brain development.  If you can have your child be part of music classes that’d be great.  My daughter is going to start piano lessons around 4 or 5.  Montessori bells are really expensive but I’m planning to do what the mother at What Did We Do All Day blog did.  I purchased my bells from Scholar’s Choice.  If you can’t afford it, do make sure music is a part of your day.

Dressing Frames:  I have these but I don’t find them practical because the way you do up snaps and buttons and zippers on a frame is different than when you do it on yourself.  If you know someone who can sew, these are a much better option.  Or just teach them with their clothes.

Construtive Triangles: The blue ones are not too expensive if you want to purchase them.  My plan is to make them out of foam.

Mystery Bag:  At $12 it’s quite affordable, but at the same time you could make your own with objects around the house.

Map Puzzles: These are quite large.  You can easily make a world map out of felt.  Here’s an awesome one I’d love to make if I had the time from Imagine Our Life.  The advantage to the wood puzzle is that the child can trace the pieces to make their own maps.  If you can afford it, get the World Puzzle.

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Zoology and Botany Puzzles: These are quite affordable, so if you’re looking for some more complicated puzzles for your child, you might want to get a few.  Otherwise they’re used for teaching parts of the animal and plants in Period 3.  I think a child can learn just as well with Nomenclature cards and growing beans in a glass jar.

Botany Cabinet:  Not necessary.  You could easily use cards to teach classification by leaf and have a child trace the geometric cabinet frames with a cuticle stick.

Land and Water Form Trays and Sandpaper Cards:  The trays can be made with Plasticine in plastic trays.  If you can afford it and want something more lasting then I’d purchase them.  The kids really love them.  The sandpaper cards are easy to make yourself.

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Trays, Jugs, and Practical Skills:  These are best bought at places like the Dollar Store, Target or even at Thrift Stores.

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Philosophy Part 2

Chapter 2 The Impact of Movement on Learning and Cognition (summary from Montessori: The Science Behind the Genius by Angeline Lillard)

One of the greatest mistakes of our day is to think of movement by itself, as something apart from the higher functions…Mental development must be connected with movement and be dependent on it.  It is vital that educational theory and practice should become informed by this idea  – Maria Montessori

Movement and learning are perpetually entwined in Montessori education.  In traditional schooling, bodily movement is limited and consists largely of reading and writing numbers and letters that abstractly represent the concepts being learned.  This lack of movement fits the model of the child being a vessel, to take in new information and commit it to memory.  Montessori saw the stationary child as problematic, because she believed that movement and thought are closely tied.  Movement is therefore integral to the educational program she developed.  Recent psychological research and theorizing support Dr. Montessori`s idea.

Movement is deeply implicated in Montessori education.  For instance, in learning to write, a child starts with manipulating knobbed cylinders, then traces shapes with his fingers, moving on to trace leaf shapes with a wooden stick.  He traces sandpaper letters, feeling the shapes of the letters themselves, he then learns to use the metal insets and trace them with a pencil and arranges wooden alphabet letters.  “In order to develop his mind a child must have objects in his environment which he can hear and see.  Since he must develop himself through his movements, through the work of his hands, he has need of objects with which he can work that provide motivation for his activity“ Maria Montessori

There is abundant research showing that movement and cognition are closely intertwined (many of these studies are discussed in the book).  People represent spaces and objects more accurately, make judgements faster and more accurately, remember information better, and show superior social cognition when their movements are aligned with what they are thinking about or learning.

What is Learning?

“In Montessori’s view, the act of learning does not involve the acquisition of anything new.  Simply being awake to the world, the absorbent mind is constantly acquiring the substance of whatever will be learned by the young child.  The ‘learning’ itself is the act of joining or connecting these previous acquisitions in such a way that they are bound together by use or meaning, and so that they have a place in a larger system of uses or meanings.  Whatever is thereby learned then becomes, like each earlier acquisition, a piece of knowledge that can be further bound to other pieces, in some later act of learning.”   David Gettman “Basic Montessori”

Geometric Cabinet

We received some new Montessori materials for our “classroom”.  One was the Geometric Cabinet.  This consists of 35 geometric insets and frames: 6 circles, 6 rectangles, 7 triangles, 6 regular polygons, 4 curvilinear figures, 6 quadrilaterals and 1 blank.  Pumpkin 1 enjoys working with it.  Right now it’s like doing a puzzle.  She’s also learning the names of different shapes.  In fact I learned something new.  I found out that an Oval is actually an egg shape (larger at one end) and what we call an Oval is really an Ellipse!  Also a diamond shape is actually called a Rombus.  So much for mommy to learn.

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As Pumpkin 1 gains fine motor skills she can begin to trace the shapes with her fingers in preparation to eventually use the metal insets which help her learn to draw the lines and curves found in letters.  In Montessori each material builds on the previous one and is preparation for the next.  They are not random toys but specially designed materials to teach and stimulate learning.  They work in a cohesive manner to connect together skills and ideas.

If you’re thinking of purchasing some Montessori materials here are some great online stores in Canada:

http://www.montessoriequipment.ca/default.asp – Affordable pricing, free shipping on orders over $300, great quality.

http://ca.montessorioutlet.com/cgi-bin/category/0 – Lowest prices, quality is good except the sandpaper materials and boxes are sold separately, no free shipping.

http://www.affordmontessori.com/index.asp – Affordable pricing, great quality, free shipping on orders over $300, great customer service.

Of the 3 I like Montessori Equipment the best.

Practical Life Skills

Toddlers and preschoolers love life skills activities.  These stimulate so many senses and skills.  Large and fine motor skills, eye hand coordination, prediction, etc.  They are also inexpensive and easy to set up. Here are two we recently did.  My daughter loved spooning the lentils with the little spoon.  The 3 year old I was babysitting wanted to do the pouring into a cup and then pouring back into the bottle with a funnel over and over again.  It was messy at first but she soon caught on how to do it.   I got all the things in this post at the dollar store.

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Teach Me To Do It Myself

This is kinda the catch phrase that sums up Montessori, especially for the toddler, preschool and primary years.  How often do we rush in to do something for our children rather than waiting and letting them try for themselves?  How often do we just routinely do things for them without even thinking that maybe they could do it?  How much easier is it to do something ourselves than to teach and wait for our child to do it?  It’s not easy, and even a little scary to let our children be independent, but it’s essential to their development.  I started stepping back with Pumpkin 1 out of necessity.  When Pumpkin 2 was born when she was only 18 months, I couldn’t respond to her as quickly.  I couldn’t hold her hand to help her up the stairs 50 times a day so I just had to let her do things on her own.  And I was surprised.  She was capable.  After reading more about trusting our children on Play at Home Mom blog I started to force myself to step back at the park (just a little bit back 🙂 in catching distance) and see what she could do.  She surprised me again.  She could climb, slide, crawl, all by herself.  And I saw that, in her case, she was cautious when she wasn’t sure of herself and didn’t do things if she felt she couldn’t (I know not every child is like that).  I started showing her how to climb things at the park, rather than just plopping her down at the top.

Now that I’ve started this journey into Montessori I’m looking for more ways to allow her to be independent and to teach her how to do things.  This past week I was emptying the dish washer and Pumpkin 1 wanted to help.  I thought for a minute and then put her kitchen stool over by the utensil drawer, opened it and put the dishwasher utensil tray of clean utensils down on the counter.  I showed her how to put a few in, and then went back to my work.  And she did it!  She put them all away, in the right spot, with just a couple mistakes.  My 2 year old actually helped me with housework.  Yay!  This age is a key time.  At this age helping out and cleaning is fun.  It’s more work right now to teach them, but before you know it, your child will be a help to you.  I hope that by instilling responsibility and organization in her right now, it will stay with her for life (I can hope, right?).

I am finding, the more independent she is, the less meltdowns she has.  Often a tantrum is from frustration, from not being able to control her surroundings.  I also try to not say “no” all the time.  Is it really a big deal if she wants to bring 5 stuffed animals on a walk?  Is it a big deal if she wants to wear a dress up dress to the store?  I have to stop myself, consider why I’m saying no – is it a safety issue?  a mess issue? a time issue?  Then, if I realize my motivation in saying no, I can better judge if I should let it go and let her do whatever it is, or if I can adapt it somehow so that it is less messy, or is safe.  And of course, sometimes I just have to say “no”.

What are some ways you have taught your child to be independent?

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