Cursive before print?!

So the Montessori method of education teaches sounds of letters before the names, lower case before the upper case, writing before reading, and….I just learned….cursive before print!  At first I thought it was crazy.  No one uses cursive nowadays, they don’t even teach it in some schools anymore, and it’s so much more difficult.  Everything a child sees is in print, so why teach cursive first?  This is take from the following interesting article:

AMI is highly supportive of using cursive as the primary mode of writing in the Casa. Using cursive instead of ball and stick print is not an antiquated notion but a developmentally appropriate method of writing for children under the age of six. All children starting from around the age of two-and-a-half scribble using broad, loopy, continuous motions that are similar to the motions used in cursive writing. By introducing cursive instead of print, Montessori guides are matching the child’s natural movements rather than the unnatural, straight marks needed in ball and stick style writing. Unlike printing, cursive appeals to the child’s innate tendency towards perfecting his/her movement and refines fine motor skills, manual dexterity, and hand-eye coordination. In addition, cursive letters are easy for children to learn and difficult for them to reverse. Whereas the ball and stick letters “b” and “d” are easily confused and reversed, the cursive letters “b” and “d” are much clearer. Children are also better able to read cursive words because they are joined together creating a clear distinction as to where a word starts and ends. Printing does not provide this control of error. It has also been observed by multiple Montessorians that children who begin writing in cursive have little to no difficulty deciphering other forms of writing, including handwritten printing and words printed from a computer. Children who begin with printing, however, have a rough transition into cursive and do not seem to recognize it as legitimate writing. With a foundation in cursive, children in the Casa are able to adapt to any writing style with ease.

It’s actually kinda convincing.  It’s something I’m going to have to read more on.

Read the full article here http://jola-montessori.com/article/the-new-war-handwriting/

Here’s an article about the cognitive benefits of cursive writing http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/memory-medic/201303/what-learning-cursive-does-your-brain

What do you think?  I’d love to hear your thoughts and/or experiences.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Cursive before print?!

  1. In our curriculum from A Beka Academy, the first ones were taught manuscript, and then cursive starting in third grade. Then, the curriculum was “updated” to have cursive, and only cursive. The ones that started with cursive have no better, and in one case, worse, handwriting than the ones that started with manuscript. I think it depends on the kid. If I had to do it over, I would start with manuscript for K4-5, and let the ones that wanted to do cursive (girls) start when they were ready.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s